You Can Get an At-Home COVID-19 Test — Here's How

The FDA has issued emergency authorizations for several home test kits. We'll tell you where to buy one.
Updated
COVID-19 home test

With COVID-19 cases on the rise in every state, anxious consumers are looking for an easier way to get reliable test results. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has stepped in to provide an emergency use authorization, or EUA, for several home testing kits — including a self-administered test that's designed to deliver results in just 30 minutes.

Finding an at-home COVID-19 test can be tricky, so we've assembled a list of FDA-authorized home kits to help you get an answer as quickly as possible.

Your At-Home COVID-19 Test Needs to Be FDA-Authorized

Not all tests are created equal. Unfortunately, scammers have been trying to sell fraudulent coronavirus tests to desperate shoppers. That's why the FDA issues EUAs; you should NOT buy any at-home COVID test that isn't authorized by the FDA.

You should NOT buy any at-home COVID test that isn't authorized by the FDA.

But what is an EUA? According to the FDA, "the FDA Commissioner may allow unapproved medical products or unapproved uses of approved medical products to be used in an emergency to diagnose, treat, or prevent serious or life-threatening diseases or conditions... when there are no adequate, approved, and available alternatives."

Where to Get an At-Home Test for COVID-19

These are the only companies we saw that provide FDA-authorized, at-home COVID-19 test kits right now:

The latest entrant on that list is Lucira Health, which received an EUA for the first fully self-administered at-home COVID-19 test. Thus far, Lucira's prescription test is the only one that provides at-home results, and in 30 minutes no less. But at the time of publication, there was no listed price for this test.

SEE ALSO: Top Coronavirus Prevention Tips for Shoppers

All other coronavirus home tests require you to send a specimen to a lab and wait for results. Unless you order the test from Pixel by LabCorp — which can bill your insurance — you can expect to pay out of pocket for your test. Prices range from $75 to $150, but they've been trending downward. For example, Vault's COVID-19 at-home test formerly had a $150 price tag, but the cost is now $119.

The list of places that offer at-home tests is growing, too. For instance, American Airlines is stepping up and offering LetsGetChecked at-home testing kits to customers traveling to any U.S. city with travel restrictions implemented. The kits don't come cheap, though — travelers will still have to pay $129 on top of their ticket price and other fees spent for making the trip.

If you aren't traveling but still want to try an at-home test, the good news is big box stores are also offering them now. Walmart and Sam's Club are both selling kits online. They vary in price from $99 to $135, based on the collection method as well as the delivery speed.

Readers, have you tried an at-home COVID-19 test? Share your experiences in the comments below!


Senior Blog Editor

Michael adds the finishing touches to most of the Blog articles you'll see on DealNews. His work has appeared on sites like Lifehacker, the Huffington Post, and MSN Money. See him rant about video games by following him on Twitter @ThatBonebright.
DealNews may be compensated by companies mentioned in this article. Please note that, although prices sometimes fluctuate or expire unexpectedly, all products and deals mentioned in this feature were available at the lowest total price we could find at the time of publication (unless otherwise specified).
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3 comments
JeffreyW75
What about at-home antibody tests, for people wanting to see if they may have had the virus in the past?
arosemena
They all sean very expensive.
BababooeyFafafefi
Nice job putting this together. Pixel that bills insurance is probably the best deal for anyone who has coverage.